Armonía ecléctica

En el madrileño barrio de Chamberí, la pareja de arquitectos con dos hijos que se instaló en este magnífico ático de principios del siglo XX buscó alejarse de los cánones del minimalismo con los que suelen asociarse las casas de quienes ejercen su misma profesión. En este espacio luminoso y de techos altos, y en colaboración con el decorador Luc Deflandre, acuñaron su concepción de la belleza y de lo hogareño articulando una conjunción de materiales, tonos y objetos cargados de historia y de recuerdos. Puertas con vidrios pintados a mano, pavimentos de cerámica en baños y cocina, y una ecléctica pero armónica combinación de muebles, cuadros, objetos y libros: el resultado es un entorno con un sello totalmente personal.

Eclectic harmony 10 May 2017 Proyectos| FacebookTwitterPinterestGoogle+ In the neighborhood of Chamberí, the architect couple with two children that moved into this magnificent top floor in a turn-of-the-century building in Madrid sought to move away from the prevailing minimalism that is usually associated with those who share their profession. In this light-filled space with high ceilings, they shaped –jointly with decorator Luc Deflandre– their vision of beauty and comfort using a combination of materials, tones, and objects charged with history and memories. Doors with panes of hand painted glass, ceramic floors in the kitchen and bathrooms, and an eclectic but harmonious combination of furniture, paintings, objects, and books: the result is an environment with a totally personal feel.

A reinterpretation of the old country kitchen

True to our brand, the owners chose bulthaup for the third time; they have one of these kitchens in their French home in Versailles. Following the expert advice of bulthaup O’Donnell, for their Madrid penthouse they selected a bulthaup b3 kitchen with a cherry wood finish that picks up the shades from the geometric pattern in the floor tiles and the rust hue of the walls, creating an atmosphere of serene warmth. This accomplished reinterpretation of an old-time country kitchen sets a symmetrical U-shaped layout of bulthaup base and wall units around a central table, leading the eye towards the panel located behind the cooking hob and the extractor hood: there, a mosaic by Delphine Messmer depicts sinuous plants and birds, echoing the earthy tones of the ensemble. In a nod to the name of the street –Marqués de Riscal, the founder of the famous Rioja winery—the cornice was recreated with a grape motif.

In a rationalist building, pure, clear lines make perfect sense. But in this Madrid penthouse apartment boasting over one hundred years of history, the presence of the everyday objects of life –set out in full view, with no need to be concealed– not only creates a coherent atmosphere, but also makes for a place that draws you in, shelters you, invites you. A place called home.

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